Tag Archives: On The Air

Join us for Mt Wachusett Activation on Saturday September 23rd

On Saturday, September 23rd we’ll head to Mt. Wachusett (W1/CR-001) in Princeton, MA.  It is only about an hour drive from Nashua.

The Address is: 345 Mountain Road, Princeton, MA.

There is a road to the summit and hiking trails to the top. If you haven’t gotten in on the SOTA action yet, come and join us and get in on the fun!  We’ll try to arrive around 10:00 am and operate until you’re too cold or have worked everyone on the bands.

6 meter beam and team at Mt Washington SOTA activation

Fred, AB1OC will be bringing the same 6 meter setup that he brought to Mt. Washington.  You can bring your own setup or operate from our portable station.  Rumor has it he also has FT8 and Meteor Scatter setup so you can try your hand at these digital modes!

Contact Jamey Finchum, KC1ENX, if you plan on coming or if you have any questions.

N1FD Mobile HF Plans for the 2017 NH QSO Party

Jamey, KC1ENX and I are planning to operate as N1FD/M (Mobile HF) during the NH QSO Party this weekend.

Our Mobile HF Station
Our Mobile HF Station

We will be operating from a 500w Mobile Station. Our goal is to activate all 10 NH counties during the contest period which starts at noon ET on Saturday and ends 6 pm on Sunday.

Planned 2017 NH QSO Party Route
Planned 2017 NH QSO Party Route

Our planned route is shown above. We are planning to operate while we are moving. Also, we plan to stop on County Lines and activate multiple Counties at the same time. wherever possible.

You can find the rules and information about the NHQP here. We hope to work you this weekend!

SOTA/POTA Activation on Mt. Washington

On August 26, a group of members did a SOTA/POTA Activation from the top of Mount Washington, the highest peak in the Northeast at 6288 ft.  Members reached the summit by different means.  Abby, AB1BY and Mike AB1YK hiked to the summit.  Patrick, KC1HDN and his XYL Dorothy took the Cog Railway and others took the Mount Washington Auto Road.

Entrance to the Mount Washington Auto Road
Entrance to the Mount Washington Auto Road

Driving up the Auto Road

Fred, AB1OC, Tony, KC1DLX, and Anita, AB1QB, road up the Auto Road.  It was an 8-mile drive to the top with breathtaking views along the way.

A Stop along the Auto Road
A Stop along the Auto Road

We had great weather on the mountain.  Clouds sometimes passed overhead but it was sunny most of the time which provided for great views of the surrounding White Mountains.

View from the Summit
View from the Summit

Operating at the Summit

When we reached the summit, we set up a 6-meter station with an Icom IC-7300 and an M2 6 meter beam at 22 ft.

6 meter beam antenna at the Summit
6-meter beam antenna at the Summit

The station was powered by batteries and solar panels.

Fred, AB1OC, Mike, AB1YK, and Tony, KC1DLX setting up the solar panels
Fred, AB1OC, Mike, AB1YK, and Tony, KC1DLX setting up the solar panels

Fred, Tony, and I had a great time operating the station, completing over 50 QSOs all over the Northeast.

Anita, AB1QB, operating on 6 meters from the summit of Mt. Washington
Anita, AB1QB, operating on 6 meters from the summit of Mt. Washington

Several other members joined us at the summit, including Al, KC1FOZ and Tom, KC1GGP.

Al, KC1FOZ and Tom, KC1GGP operating from the summit
Al, KC1FOZ and Tom, KC1GGP operating from the summit

After the Activation

Thanks to Tony, KC1DXL, and his XYL Josephine, who hosted us for a delicious dinner at their nearby condo after the activation.

Thanks to Jamey, KC1ENX, for planning a great day for club members!  This was our 3rd SOTA/POTA activation this year and each one has been better than the previous one!  We’re looking forward to the next summit!

Here are more pictures from Mount Washington:

Mt. Washington Summit ViewMt. Washington Summit View 2Mt. Washington Summit View 3Mt. Washington Summit View 4Mt. Washington Summit View 5Mt. Washington Summit View 66m Station6m Station 26m Station 3Solar PowerSolar Power 2Operating on Mt WashingtonOperating on Mt Washington 2Mt Washington SummitNashua Area Radio Club Members on Mt. WashingtonNashua Area Radio Club Members on Mt. Washington 2Cog RailwayCog Railway 2Cog Railway 3Auto Road  Views 4Auto Road  Views 3Auto Road  Views 2Auto Road ViewsAuto Road EntranceAntenna on the MountainAntenna on the Mountain 2Antenna on the Mountain 3AB1QB OperatingAB1OC Operating

How did I hang my dipole 50+ feet high in the trees?

Dipole Antenna Tree

I wanted to make an article that would explain to anyone who visits my home or QTH that would answer the question on “How did you get that rope so high in the trees and how did you get that rope over the perfect branch?

I started out with a fishing pole and a 4-inch long stick from the woods.  After a few attempts of getting the stick up and over the tree with the fishing line it finally made it over the tree and back to the ground.  I then reeled in all the fishing line while pulling a string over the tree.  After the string, I used it to pull over 3/8” poly rope.

I came up with the following idea to get a rope over the perfect branch.

Dipole Antenna Tree

The 3/8″ line holds an old branch from the woods in the center. The yellow rope to the left is the “control line” and the right side has a half rotten log as a weight secured with a slip knot as shown below.

Dipole Antenna Tree

In the diagram below the light blue line represents the yellow control line from the photo.  As you lift the whole unit you should consider that the weight of the control line may offset your balance as you go higher.    The magenta line shows the string with a slip knot.  When the half rotten log made it over the desired perfect branch by combinations of pulling the 3/8″ rope at either end (shown black) and/or the control line (shown light blue) I pulled out the slip knot and the half rotten log fell over the perfect branch along with the string (shown magenta).

Dipole Antenna Tree

I replaced the string with rope and then a wire rope loop (shown red). The wire rope will not fade and fall apart from the sun’s UV rays. The yellow circle represents a pulley for the poly rope that holds up the dipole. When the poly rope breaks down from UV, wear and tear it can easily be replaced by lowering the pulley.  I added weight to maintain proper tension on the dipole antenna as shown below.

Dipole Antenna Tree

In theory, the tension will remain the same even in wind storms when the trees swing back and forth. It turns out that an old cast iron rotor from my Toyota was the perfect weight for the application!

73,

Mike AB1YK