Tag Archives: Internet

Abby, AB1BY Interview on Ham Nation

One of our own, Abby AB1BY appeared on Ham Nation on Wednesday, October 25th. The show including Abby’s interview was streamed live over the Internet. Gordon West, WB6NOA, interviewed Abby. You can view Abby’s Interview (about 3:22 in from the beginning) below:

Abby was quite a hit during her Ham Nation debut. The chatroom activity associated with her segment was off the charts! Gordon has invited Abby back to do a monthly segment on Ham Nation. Stay tuned!

Fred, AB1OC

HAB-2 Launch This Saturday – How To Track Our High-Altitude Balloon

We are planning the second launch of our High-Altitude Balloon (HAB-2) this Saturday, October 28th at approximately 11 am ET.

You can view the story of our first launch here on our website and you can view the video from our first High-Altitude Balloon launch above.

High-Altitude Balloon Launch Site and Weather

The weather and Jetstream conditions look good for our HAB-2 launch!

High-Altitude Balloon 2 Launch Site in Winchester NH
HAB-2 Launch Site in Winchester NH

We will be launching from the school in Winchester, NH at around 11 am ET. Nashua Area Radio Society members and friends are invited to join us for our launch.

High-Altitude Balloon 1 Launch!
HAB-1 Launch!

We have been working with the STEM club at Bishop-Guertin HS here in Nashua, NH. The students will handle HAB-2 launch preparations and the launch. Launch preparations will begin on site at 9:30 am ET.

WInchester NH Weather Forecast for Launch
Winchester NH Weather Forecast for Launch

The weather forecast looks great for our launch on Saturday with clear skies and moderate winds. These conditions should enable us to capture some spectacular video from HAB-2 during its flight!

Tracking HAB-2

I wanted to share some information about tracking our HAB-2 as it flies. Our balloon will carry’s a GPS receiver and a 2m APRS Transmitter.

High-Altitude Balloon Flight Platform
HAB Flight Platform

The onboard APRS transmitter will operate on the Amateur Radio standard terrestrial APRS frequency of 144.390 MHz and will transmit our HAB’s position, heading, speed, altitude and other telemetry data every minute during HAB-2’s flight. The transmitter is battery-powered and generates a 250 mW signal into a dipole antenna suspended from HAB’-2s flight platform. HAB-2 will use N1FD-11 as its call sign.

High-Altitude Balloon On Aprs.fi
HAB-2 On Aprs.fi

HAB-2’s APRS packets will be picked up by ground-based Digipeaters and iGates and will be relayed to aprs.fi where the HAB’s current location and flight path can be tracked.  You can click on the link in the previous line to see HAB-2’s current location and flight track.

High-Altitude Balloon 2 Flight Path Projection
HAB-2 Flight Path Projection

Based upon online HAB flight prediction calculators that we have been using, we expect the HAB’s flight to last a little more than 2 1/2 hours. The HAB should reach an altitude of over 105,000 ft before the balloon bursts and the parachute on the flight platform brings HAB-2 back to the ground at a safe speed. The above predictions will likely somewhat different from HAB-2’s actual flight path. Based upon the predictions, HAB-2 will be traveling approximately 100 km between its takeoff point and landing near Maine.

High-Altitude Balloon APRS Packet Information
HAB APRS Packet Information

Aprs.fi will store and display a copy of all of the APRS AX.25 packets transmitted by HAB-2 during its flight. Of particular interest to the STEM element of the flight will be the Balloon’s data on atmospheric temperature and pressure conditions at different altitudes.

All you need to track HAB-2 during its flight is Internet access and a web browser. Just click on one of the aprs.fi links here to see HAB-2’s current location and altitude. If you have an APRS ground station, you may also be able to receive HAB-2’s telemetry directly during the flight.

We will post updates on launch plans and the flight in the Youth Forum on our website.

T minus 1 day and counting until HAB-2 launches….

We have launched! Your can Track HAB-2 on apris.fi using the call sign N1FD-11.

 

Fred, AB1OC

New Pinterest Ham Radio Feed Page

Our Club’s website has many nice pictures taken during our many activities and from our member’s projects and articles. We have added a new social media presence on Pinterest to feature some of our clubs many activities and projects. Our club’s Pinterest Ham Radio Feed is included along with others on a new social media page on our website.

Our New Pinterest Ham Radio Feed Page
Our New Pinterest Ham Radio Feed Page

Pinterest is designed to collect related images together by pinning them to Boards. A Pinterest user can create one or more Boards and Pin related images to them. These work much the same way as you’d pin up favorite photos on a bulletin board. Pinned pictures are linked to the web pages or articles that they came from so it’s easy to find related photos and information via Pinterest. Also, there are several browser extensions to make pinning images to your Pinterest Boards easy to do as you browse the web.

Visiting Our Pinterest Ham Radio Feed Page

We’ve created a Pinterest Board for our club’s activities and projects and it is included along with other Amateur Related Boards and Pin collections on a new page here on n1fd.org.

Pinterest Ham Radio Feed Menu Location
Pinterest Ham Radio Feed Menu Location

Our new Pinterest Feeds Page can be reached from the menu on our website. It is in the same area as our other Social Media Feeds. Take a minute and check out the new page. Also, come back and visit it regularly as we will be adding new pins to it frequently.

If you have favorite Amateur Radio related Pinterest Boards or Pin Collections, please let us know via an email to [email protected].

Fred, AB1OC

A Good ‘Day’ To Be A Ham? by Paul Mills, AC0HY

We have such a wonderful hobby with its myriad, almost limitless facets. No room for boredom here! Paul Mills, AC0HY, President of The Kaw Valley Amateur Radio Club [Kansas], wrote a very interesting article in their Newsletter, THE TRANSCEIVER September 2017. It’s republished here with his permission.Club Web Page: www.KVARC.org     Layne AE1N

A Good ‘Day’ To Be A Ham? by Paul Mills, AC0HY

I was thumbing through some magazines for inspiration, as I often do. Magazines for me are seldom read but frequently browsed. In some, I observe the advertisements more than I do the articles. I do read a few articles from beginning to end. But to a large extent, I look at titles, pictures, schematics, and captions. And frequently I scan the article for areas of interest. Today this caused me to think about how things have changed in my lifetime.

My earliest days in radio, tubes were still the norm. Transistors were out there, but the quality was not great, and most were used in portable or mobile electronics. Equipment was large and heavy. Transmitters and receivers were frequently separate. Power amplifiers were very large, and often two pieces – the amplifier, and the power supply.

Over the years, transistors changed, the move from germanium to silicone greatly improved reliability, though there still remains a place for a few germanium devices. And while early transistors were bipolar devices, there came to be many FET’s and a number of new materials and techniques used in their construction.

In many ways, this was a great time. It was easy to roll up your sleeves, and put together circuits, and observe how they worked. During these days, many parts houses sold electronics components. At one time, Topeka had 5 or 6 wholesale parts houses. Radio and television repair was a common business.   But even before this era was over, Integrated Circuits, and Large Scale Integration was upon us.

In many ways, this was a great time for the radio enthusiast. Parts were widely available, and building from scratch was therefore fairly easy. Likewise, repair was possible due to the wide availability of parts. Now Very Large Scale Integration and surface mount technology has totally changed electronics, and thus radio. This has done a lot of positive things for us.

Consider that your Smartphone is tiny compared to the radio-telephone of the 1970’s. And in addition, the Smartphone contains a room full of similar era computing power. On the down side of all of this, parts are harder to come by. If you need parts, you will probably have to order them, and wait. And in many cases, it is cheaper to replace a product than it is to repair.

What does this mean to us as ham radio operators? It means that to a degree, all of us have become appliance operators. Does that mean that we are doomed to a dumbed down hobby? NO! There are plenty of things we can do if we so desire.

Most obvious of these things we can still do is to build our own antennas. There are lots of antenna designs that we can experiment with. Many antenna projects can be done with a spool of #12 wire, and some homemade insulators. Let your imagination run wild.

Those who would like to play with electronics may find some satisfaction with parts houses such as Mouser, DigiKey, Newark, Arrow, MCM, Jameco.

Additionally, eBay can be a wonderful source for things to experiment with. And, if there is something you forgot, don’t forget the Radio Shack replacement –Amazon. You will be surprised at what you can find on Amazon – and if you have Amazon Prime, frequently have in 2 days with free shipping.

In many cases, instead of building from scratch, you will buy things like RaspberryPi, Arduino, or other small single board computers. These can be used to automate various tasks in the Shack. On eBay, there is a wealth of boards that can be found to do just about anything you want. Your imagination is the limit to what you can do here. There are SDR radio kits, various parts and pieces that can be cobbled together to create your own receiver, transmitter, transceiver, etc.

If this seems hard to believe, start searching the internet, you will find that there are lots of people already doing these things.I know these are not for everyone, but hopefully it will cause some of you to broaden your horizons. Even if you do not choose to do any of them, it can be interesting to find a read about what others are doing.

Until next time…73 de AC0HY

Ham Radio Hobby