The Joy of the QSO by Mike AD5A

In the September issue of Amateur Radio.com, Mike, AD5A, shares his thoughts about his QSO Joys … Layne AE1N

The Joy of the QSO by Mike AD5A

18 September 2017

Since my retirement, I suppose I’ve had a little more time to think, philosophize if you will, about the important things in life. As my work career fades into the past, I’ve quickly come to realize that events and issues from my work-life, at the end of the day, weren’t that important at all. The things that I stressed and fretted over where simply mirages of importance that faded away as time passed.

So, I’ve asked myself, what is it about Ham Radio that’s so important? Many of us spend a lot of time in the hobby, so where is the meaning, where is the value added to our lives? Many of us chase awards, join clubs, go on expeditions and have many significant achievements in our ham careers that bring a certain level of satisfaction. However, what we soon learn is that it’s the chase, not the finish that’s exciting. I’ve enjoyed very much chasing DXCC Honor Roll, WAE-TOP, IOTA, SOTA and competing in a variety of contests. However, once the objective is achieved, the excitement of working toward the goal is gone and the sense of accomplishment is not quite as satisfying as the thrill of the chase.

So in my thinking about what’s lasting and important about ham radio, at least to me, starts from a simple QSO. QSO’s bring joy in many ways, i.e., marking a needed entity of the list, working a new club member, getting that rare country that you never thought possible, whether QRP or QRO or perhaps a special contact on Top Band or the Magic Band. It’s QSO’s that bring joy. However, many of these QSO’s are the 599, TU type of QSO and are more focused on accomplishment or earning some award than the relationship side of ham radio.

As I’ve progressed or maybe matured or perhaps just gotten more sentimental, I get a lot of lasting joy from a simple rag-chew. Does a rag-chew bring my recognition, no? Will it qualify me for any awards, maybe, but probably not But what it does do is allow me to meet real people with similar interests as me. Since I retired I find that I have more and more rag-chews with the most interesting people. And I am starting to come across guys multiple times and we pick up where we left off from the previous QSO. It’s wonderful. I don’t have to worry if I’ve already worked them on the band I’m on, they are glad, at least I think they are, to take my call and have a chat, I don’t have to worry about getting a “worked B4” response.

I’ve found there’s lots of unexpected pleasure in the simple things. A simple QSO gives me lots of satisfaction. Don’t get me wrong, you may well hear my call in a DX pileup or calling CQ in a contest, but I’ve learned to stop and smell the roses and the roses of ham radio, to me, are the relationships you can build and develop through conversational ham radio.

My mode of choice is CW, but I don’t suppose it really matters what mode you use. Just get on the air and have a real chat, you might find it brings a little more meaning to the hobby.

Mike Crownover, AD5A, is a regular contributor to AmateurRadio.com and writes from Texas, USA. Contact him at [email protected].

 

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